Blog: 28 October 2016

Friday, October 28

Week two and our chefs burst into class and into a song and dance routine.  All that energy was taken to the garden, where they sniffed the variety of herbs that grow and selected fresh oregano to season the cauliflower and apple side dish in today’s recipe, agreeing that it smelled like pizza.  With clean hands and calm demeanors, we divided the class into two groups, one to prep and bake the chicken and one to prep and bake the vegetables.

“I’m getting my cooking on!” said Nailah Lipscomb, after she and Cianni Green abandoned using spoons to try and cover the chicken with marinade, and plunged their clean hands right into the bowl.  The chicken cooked through but did not get brown in the oven, so we finished it in a skillet on the stove. The vegetable chefs chopped apples, cauliflower and onions—with a few tears from Malaysia Green “It hurts so bad!” she said, fanning her eyes.  The vegetable crew all had a turn chopping the onions and gained skill and confidence with chopping.

While everything was cooking, the girls set the table, and made predictions about the day’s meal using their best adjectives and nibbling on a few extra pecans and apple pieces. “I think of ice cream when I taste pecans,” said Nailah Lipscomb.  “I think of butter,” said Brazil Taylor.

Again this week, the girls finished, set the table and enthusiastically sat down to their meal.  “It not only looks delicious, it tastes delicious,” said Cianni Green.  No one disagreed and our enthusiastic chefs became enthusiastic diners.
 

Friday, October 28

What do you do when you have to nail a new rib into your boat  What happens when the sides of the boat bounce a little and the nail just doesn't go in?

Well, you find a solution!  You need a hand anvil!  As your one hand hits the nail head with a hammer, your other hand holds the hand anvil against the rib and the boat's side so that all is strong enough to not bounce at the impact of the hammer and nail.  Sound easy?  We hope not--because it's not easy.  This was the hard work being done on Thursday afternoon in the shop requiring coordination and consentration.

We started by steaming the cedar rib so that it would bend just right.  The steamer was at full boil and the cedar bent very well into shape around the hull of the boat (see the picture below).  Once it was bent, it was time to slip the rib into the boat.  All the prep work had been done over the past few weeks.  The rib slipped into its's spot perfectly.  At that point, the only thing left was to fasten the rib to the rest of boat, which is where the hand anvil came in.  The students tackled the project fully. 

  

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